Because it's only your visual system that's letting you know where the ball is.

You may ask what sports vision therapy is, and who would be a candidate for such a program? Maybe you've been told that you have 6/6 vision. But that only means that you can see something small from far away. If your serious about hitting the ball better, or catching it cleaner,or judging exactly where the basket is, then you”ll want to have a visual skills evaluation at LedermanVision. At your evaluation you will find out if your visual system is brining you the most accurate information, as quickly as possible to your brain. And if it isn't,the good news is that you can improve it.

Sports vision therapy can really benefit any athlete looking to improve their visual skills to an above average level, but specifically those players who are inconsistent in their performance, have concentration issues and are affected by fatigue or game stress. Although vision is only one of the many components of an elite athlete, one needs to ensure that any underlying visual deficits have been addressed, since they may be the reason a player is not performing to their full potential. In any sport, an athlete is continually taking in visual information. Whether it is in response to the ball or other players, the athlete must then process the information and move the body to make the appropriate reactions. The more efficient a player is with these skills, the more successful they will be.

Sports vision therapy works on improving the visual abilities of an athlete that are most necessary for excellence in their sport. Some of these abilities include eye-hand coordination, dynamic visual acuity, tracking, focusing, visual reaction time, and peripheral vision. All activities are done on a sport specific basis with a custom tailored program for each sport and athlete. Therefore, a program for a tennis player will emphasize eye-hand coordination and dynamic visual acuity whereas a program for a golfer will concentrate on visual alignment and depth perception to see the breaks in the greens.

Many athletes are amazed at how we can predict their performance based on our findings from a visual screening. If you are having trouble getting to the next level in your particular sport even after stepping up your practice, you might have a visual problem limiting your success.

Peak Visual Skills Lead to Peak Performance.

The visual skills necessary for peak athletic performance in many sports are:

  • Dynamic Visual Acuity – the ability to see objects clearly that are in motion.
  • Eye Tracking – the ability to "keep your eye on the ball."
  • Eye Focusing – the ability to change focus from one object to another quickly and clearly.
  • Peripheral Awareness – being able to see things out of the corner of your eye.
  • Depth Perception – the ability to quickly and accurately judge the distance and speed of objects.
  • Eye-Hand or Eye-Body Coordination – the ability to use our eyes to effectively direct the movements of our hands/body.

LedermanVision clinics are the only offices in the country where you will find the professional expertise and equipment to improve your vision skills. Only at our clinics will you find the Sanet Vision Integrator. Take a look for yourself at http://www.svivision.com/therapy.php

We are also importing the Nike SPARQ vapor strobe glasses. These hi-tech glasses will take your training to whole new level. Watch the video.

With the other state of the art equipment you will find in our centers, you can be sure to see an improvement in your vision skills and in your game!

If you're serious about hitting the ball more accurately and more often, then call today to reserve time for an evaluation. It's the obvious "next step" to becoming even better at your sport.

Vision for Tennis

The majority of tennis-training programs have been designed with the following criteria in mind: technique, speed, agility, footwork, strength, mental toughness and match strategies. These criteria have also been used to judge tennis ability. However, our body will only respond to what it can see. Despite this fact, little attention has been paid to vision.

You have always been told to "watch the ball" or "keep your eye on the ball!" These phrases seem to be a maxim that should solve this problem when playing tennis. However, as much as you know what you need to do, it's much harder to actually do it! Why is it so hard to keep our eyes on the ball?

Not watching the ball is typically due to "visual wandering" and a lack of visual discipline/training. Just looking whilst running is not easy at all. Try reading a newspaper and running on the spot. You will notice that the running caused difficulty reading the newspaper. By undertaking a sports vision therapy program, you can improve your performance. That's because the brain, can be taught to control your eyes more efficiently. Your eyes have 12 muscles that control them, and you can learn to control your eyes so that they track more accurately, focus better, and team better. By seeing better, you can play better because what and how you see, affects everything how you will do in the game.

Some of the required visual skills that can be enhanced through training are:

  • DYNAMIC VISUAL ACUITY
  • EYE TRACKING
  • EYE TEAMING & DEPTH PERCEPTION
  • PERIPHERAL VISION
  • EYE-HAND COORDINATION

DYNAMIC VISUAL ACUITY: Playing tennis is a visual stress test. It requires more from your eyes than the daily activities of reading the newspaper and working on the computer. The player who sees the ball late and exercises poor visual judgment is at a distinct disadvantage. An aggressive player will move around the court, which tires and weakens your visual judgment of ball placement and speed. Running impairs visual acuity; many errors occur after a player has been forced to run for a shot. The solution, of course, is preparation. You can hone dynamic visual acuity so that you can function optimally in matches in which the ball is hit hard and you are forced to run a great deal.The two factors that make seeing the ball difficult are your motion and the speed of the ball. Thus, players need the ability to see the ball more effectively and efficiently while the player and the ball are moving.

EYE TRACKING: This is the ability to follow a moving object smoothly and accurately with both eyes. In tennis, it is desirable to track the ball to the moment of contact, that is to "see the ball hit the racquet". Because the ball is often moving so fast, we need to "anticipate" and pay attention to preparation- where the ball is going to be and when it's going to be there. All of this starts with good tracking.

EYE TEAMING & DEPTH PERCEPTION: This is the ability to use both eyes together (in unison) and to judge relative distances of objects and to see and move accurately in three-dimensional space. Although we look at the world with both eyes, we are aware of only a single impression of the environment. When the eyes work together as a team, the perceptions of each eye are coordinated. Depth, for example, is perceived when two-dimensional images received by each eye are fused in the brain into one three dimensional image. As a result, we can judge distance easily and locate objects in space. On the other hand, anyone whose eyes do not team up finds it very difficult to judge distance.

PERIPHERAL VISION: This is the ability to maintain and interpret what is happening on the court (in your peripheral vision) while attending to the ball (the specific central vision). A player must concentrate on the incoming ball, account for his own position on the court and what his opponent is doing across the net. All three are crucial for a player's "triple vision".

EYE-HAND COORDINATION: This is how the visual system guides the motor system. The eyes lead the hands- not the other way around. Coaches and players who refer to "hand-eye coordination" have missed the significance of this relationship. The visual system leads the motor system. We all use eye-hand coordination in our daily lives and take this skill for granted. Driving a car requires constant coordination between vision, and hands, and feet. Turning a car at an intersection requires the processing of visual information by the brain and an immediate reaction by the hands on the steering wheel to the brain's command. Parallel parking, a more difficult task, requires a series of quick adjustments between the visual system and the hands and feet. Braking is a good example of eye-foot coordination. When we want to stop or slow down, the foot controls the brake pedal, but our vision first processes the information that tells us where and when to brake.

LedermanVision clinics are the only offices in the country where you will find the professional expertise and equipment to improve your vision skills. Only at our clinics will you find the Sanet Vision Integrator. Take a look for yourself at http://www.svivision.com/therapy.php

We are also importing the Nike SPARQ vapor strobe glasses. These hi-tech glasses will take your training to whole new level. Watch the video.

With the other state of the art equipment you will find in our centers, you can be sure to see an improvement in your vision skills and in your game!

If you're serious about hitting the ball more accurately and more often, then call today to reserve time for an evaluation. It's the obvious "next step" to becoming even better at your sport.